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Thread: Testimonial from Federal University of Minas Gerais, and Fumec University, Brazil

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    Testimonial from Federal University of Minas Gerais, and Fumec University, Brazil

    "I started using MovAlyzeR in 2008 to investigate motor learning and control in goal-directed movements. I've been using this product to (1) investigate the relationship between the impulsivity, a personality trait, and motor behavior, and (2) to investigate manual motor control in patients with bipolar disorder. MovAlyzeR is very user-friendly software, which is important me as I do not have much experience in programming." -- Dr. Guilherme Menezes Lage, Federal University of Minas Gerais, and Fumec University, Brazil.

    Publications

    A kinematic analysis of the association between impulsivity and manual aiming control
    Guilherme Menezes Lage, Leandro Fernandes Malloy-Diniz, Fernando Silva Neves, Paulo Henrique Paiva de Moraes, Humberto Corrêa.
    Human Movement Science, 2012, in press
    http://www.sciencedirect.com/science...67945711001679
    Abstract. Two characteristics usually found in impulsive behavior are deficits in response inhibition and the inability to delay gratification. The former behavior is called motor impulsivity, and the second is called cognitive impulsivity. This study investigates the association of motor and cognitive impulsivity with manual aiming control. We administered two neuropsychological tests to 81 healthy participants to measure their levels of motor and cognitive impulsivity. A manual aiming motor task was also applied. Subsequently, from the initial group of 81 participants, two subgroups of 27 individuals were selected by their scores on (1) motor impulsivity and (2) cognitive impulsivity, and their motor performances were compared. While a group was comprised by the top 33.3% high-impulsive participants, the other was comprised by the bottom 33.3% low-impulsives participants. The results indicate that motor impulsivity is more related to motor control than cognitive impulsivity. Differences between motor impulsivity groups were found in the duration of the primary submovement, peak velocity, score of response inhibition errors and incorrect hits score. It was found that in situations in which the temporal and spatial demands to the motor system were high, the impulsivity had a functional, adaptive effect on motor control.

    Impulsivity and the 5-HTTLPR Polymorphism in a Non-Clinical Sample
    Guilherme M. Lage,1,2* Leandro F. Malloy-Diniz,3 Lorena O. Matos,1 Marisa A. R. Bastos,1 Suzana S. C. Abrantes,1 and Humberto Corrêa4,5
    1College of Human, Social and Health Sciences, FUMEC University, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
    2Institute of Biological Sciences, Neuroscience Graduate Program, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
    3Department of Psychology, College of Philosophy and Human Sciences, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
    4Department of Mental Health, College of Medicine, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil
    5Sainte Anne Hospital-University Paris Decartes, Paris, Île-de-France, France

    Monica Uddin, Editor
    University of Michigan, United States of America
    * E-mail: menezeslage@gmail.com
    Conceived and designed the experiments: GML LFM HC.
    Performed the experiments: GML LOM MB SA.
    Analyzed the data: GML LFM HC.
    Contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools: GML LOM SA.
    Wrote the paper: GML LFM HC.

    FULL TEXT: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3046116/
    PLoS One. 2011; 6(2): e16927.
    Published online 2011 February 28. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0016927 PMCID: PMC3046116
    Background. Impulsivity has been associated with serotonergic system functions. However, few researchers have investigated the relationship between a polymorphism in the promoter of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and the different components of impulsivity in a non-clinical population. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between a polymorphism in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR) and the different components of impulsivity in a non-clinical population.
    Methodology/Principal Findings. We administered two neuropsychological tests, the Continuous Performance Task and the Iowa Gambling Task, to 127 healthy participants to measure their levels of motor, attentional and non-planning impulsivity. Then, these participants were grouped by genotype and gender, and their scores on impulsivity measures were compared. There were no significant differences between group scores on attentional, motor and non-planning impulsivity.
    Conclusions/Significance. Our results suggest that 5-HTTLPR genotype is not significantly associated with subsets of impulsive behavior in a non-clinical sample when measured by neuropsychological tests. These findings are discussed in terms of the sensitivity of neuropsychological tests to detect impulsivity in a non-clinical population and the role of gender and race in the relationship between the 5-HTTLPR and impulsivity.

    Motor learning and music performance: Reflections on concepts and applicability
    Abstract: Introduction to concepts and issues from the field of Motor Learning and its possible applications to Music Performance and its teaching. The paper focus on the comprehension of factors and processes involved in movement production and acquisition, especially those required in the daily practice of instrumentalists, singers and conductors. This article results from a collaboration between the project "Pearls" and "Hot Potatoes" of the Double Bass (sponsored by Brazilian agency CNPq) and GEDAM (Motor Development and Learning Research Group) from The Physical Education School (UFMG).
    Keywords: motor learning, music performance, motor skill, deliberate practice.
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

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    Nov 2003
    Posts
    3,353

    Guilherme et al. (2012). kinematic analysis of manual aiming on euthymic bipolar ...

    http://www.psy-journal.com/article/P...05471/abstract

    A kinematic analysis of manual aiming control on euthymic bipolar disorder
    Guilherme M. Lage, Leandro F. Malloy-Diniz, Fernando S. Neves, L*via G. Gallo, Alexandre S. Valentini, Humberto Corrêa
    Received 8 April 2012; received in revised form 8 August 2012; accepted 25 September 2012. published online 29 October 2012.

    Motor deficits in tasks that require force steadiness or scaling of movement velocity have been found in bipolar disorder (BD). A potential explanation for these results is the abnormal functioning of the frontostriatal circuitry. We designed this study to investigate the possible impairments in a manual aiming task. Fifteen euthymic BD patients and 15 healthy controls performed 100 trials of a goal-directed manual movement with a non-inking pen on a digitizing tablet. Four different conditions of execution were required. The control condition appeared on the computer screen in 70% of the trials, and the other three conditions, (a) distractor, (b) inhibition of response and (c) higher index of difficulty, each appeared in 10% of the trials. Compared to the controls, the BD patients were less fluent in their movements, relied more heavily on visual feedback to control their manual movements and presented a lower spatial accuracy. We found that motor deficits in euthymic BD were observed in the kinematic analysis of manual aiming. Our findings are consistent with the hypothesis of abnormal functioning of the frontostriatal circuitry in euthymic BD.

    Keywords: Movement disorders, Psychomotor performance, Dyskinesias, Basal ganglia, Bipolar disorder

    PII: S0165-1781(12)00547-1
    doi:10.1016/j.psychres.2012.09.046
    © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Company http://www.neuroscript.net and work http://www.neuroscript.net/hans_leo_teulings.php on handwriting and drawing movement recording and processing.

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